• Blin

    Origin 1

    From Middle English blinnen, from Old English blinnan ("to stop, cease"), from Proto-Germanic *bilinnaną ("to turn aside, swerve from"), from Proto-Indo-European *ley-, *leya- ("to deflect, turn away, vanish, slip"), equivalent to - + lin. Cognate with Old High German bilinnan ("to yield, stop, forlet, give away"), Old Norse linna (Swedish dialectal linna, "to pause, rest").

    Full definition of blin

    Verb

    1. (obsolete) To cease from.
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:nathemore for that spectacle bad,
        Did th'other two their cruell vengeaunce blin ....
    2. (archaic or dialectal) To stop, desist; to cease to move, run, flow, etc., let up.
      • 1880, Margaret Ann Courtney, English Dialect Society, Glossary of words in use in Cornwall:A child may cry for half an hour, and never blin ; it may rain all day, and never blin ; the train ran 100 miles, and never blinned.
      • 1908, John Masefield, A sailor's garland:Thus blinned their boast, as we well ken

    Noun

    blin

    1. (obsolete) cessation; end

    Origin 2

    From Russian блин (blin, "pancake, flat object").

    1. A blintz.

    Anagrams

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