• Compound

    Pronunciation

    • UK IPA: /kɒmpaʊnd/
    • US enPR: kŏm'pound, IPA: /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/

    Origin 1

    Possibly from Malay kampong, kampung ("group of buildings, village"), via Dutch or Portuguese

    Online Etymology Dictionary

    .

    Full definition of compound

    Noun

    compound

    (plural compounds)
    1. an enclosure within which workers, prisoners, or soldiers are confined
    2. a group of buildings situated close together, eg. for a school or block of offices

    Synonyms

    Pronunciation

    • adj. and noun UK IPA: /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/
    • adj. and noun US enPR: kŏm'pound, IPA: /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/
    • verb US enPR: kəmpound', IPA: /kəmˈpaʊnd/
    • Rhymes: -aʊnd

    Origin 2

    From Middle English compounen, from Middle French componre, compondre ("to put together"), from Latin componere, from Latin com- ("together") + ponere ("to put").

    Adjective

    compound

    1. composed of elements; not simplea compound word
      • I. WattsCompound substances are made up of two or more simple substances.
    2. (music) An octave higher than originally (i.e. a compound major second is equivalent to a major ninth).

    Synonyms

    Antonyms

    Noun

    compound

    (plural compounds)
    1. Anything made by combining several things.
    2. (chemistry, dated) A substance made from any combination elements.
    3. (chemistry) A substance formed by chemical union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight.
    4. (linguistics) A lexeme that consists of more than one stem; compound word; for example laptop, formed from lap and top.

    Synonyms

    Verb

    1. (transitive) To form (a resulting mixture) by combining different elements, ingredients, or parts.to compound a medicine
      • Sir Walter Scottincapacitating him from successfully compounding a tale of this sort
    2. (transitive) To assemble (ingredients) into a whole; to combine, mix, or unite.
      • AddisonWe have the power of altering and compounding those images into all the varieties of picture.
    3. (transitive) To modify or change by combination with some other thing or part; to mingle with something else.
      • ShakespeareOnly compound me with forgotten dust.
    4. (transitive, legal) To settle by agreeing on less than the claim, or on different terms than those stipulated.to compound a debt
    5. (transitive) To settle amicably; to adjust by agreement; to compromise.
      • ShakespeareI pray, my lords, let me compound this strife.
    6. (intransitive) To come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; usually followed by with before the person participating, and for before the thing compounded or the consideration.
      • ShakespeareHere's a fellow will help you to-morrow; ... compound with him by the year.
      • ClarendonThey were at last glad to compound for his bare commitment to the Tower.
      • R. CarewCornwall compounded to furnish ten oxen after Michaelmas for thirty pounds.
      • HudibrasCompound for sins they are inclined to
        By damning those they have no mind to.
    7. (transitive, obsolete) To compose; to constitute.
      • Shakespearehis pomp and all what state compounds

    Synonyms

    Derived terms

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