• File

    Pronunciation

    • UK IPA: /ˈfaɪəl/, /faɪl/
    • US IPA: /faɪl/
    • Rhymes: -aɪl, -aɪəl
    • Homophones: phial

    Origin 1

    French fil ("thread"), Latin filum ("thread").

    Full definition of file

    Noun

    file

    (plural files)
    1. A collection of papers collated and archived together.
      • ShakespeareIt is upon a file with the duke's other letters.
    2. A roll or list.
      • Shakespearea file of all the gentry
    3. Course of thought; thread of narration.
      • Sir H. WottonLet me resume the file of my narration.
    4. (computing) An aggregation of data on a storage device, identified by a name.I'm going to delete these unwanted files to free up some disk space.

    Synonyms

    Verb

    1. (transitive) To commit official papers to some office
    2. (transitive) To place in an archive in a logical place and order
    3. (transitive) To store a file (aggregation of data) on a storage medium such as a disc or another computer.
    4. (intransitive, with for, chiefly legal) To make a formal request for the benefit of an official status.She filed for divorce the next day.The company filed for bankruptcy when the office opened on Monday.''They filed for a refund under their warranty.
      • 2012, May 27, Nathan Rabin, TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992), The episode’s unwillingness to fully commit to the pathos of the Bart-and-Laura subplot is all the more frustrating considering its laugh quota is more than filled by a rollicking B-story that finds Homer, he of the iron stomach and insatiable appetite, filing a lawsuit against The Frying Dutchman when he’s hauled out of the eatery against his will after consuming all of the restaurant’s shrimp (plus two plastic lobsters).
    5. (transitive, obsolete) To set in order; to arrange, or lay away.
      • Beaumont and FletcherI would have my several courses and my dishes well filed.

    Derived terms

    Origin 2

    French file, from filer, “to spin out”, “arrange one behind another”, Latin fīlāre, from filum, “thread”.

    Noun

    file

    (plural files)
    1. A column of people one behind another, whether "single file" or in a large group with many files side by side.The troops marched in Indian file.
    2. (chess) one of the eight vertical lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those which run from number to number). The analog horizontal lines are the ranks.

    Verb

    1. (intransitive) To move in a file.The applicants kept filing into the room until it was full.

    Derived terms

    Origin 3

    Old English feol. Cognate with Dutch vijl, German Feile, West Frisian file.

    Noun

    file

    (plural files)
    1. A hand tool consisting of a handle to which a block of coarse metal is attached, and used for removing sharp edges or for cutting, especially through metal.
    2. (slang, archaic) A cunning or resourceful person.
      • ThackerayWill is an old file, in spite of his smooth face.

    Derived terms

    terms derived from file (tool) (noun)

    Verb

    1. (transitive) to smooth, grind, or cut with a fileI'd better file the bottoms of the table legs. Otherwise they will scratch the flooring.

    Derived terms

    terms derived from file (use tool) {verb}

    Origin 4

    Middle English filen ("to defile"), from Old English fȳlan ("to defile, make foul"), from fūl ("foul"). More at defile.

    Verb

    1. (archaic) to defile
    2. to corrupt

    Anagrams

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